Archive for the 'Privacy / Rights' Category

June 7th 2012

Scary…

This is a really disturbing piece of news:

Link

I did not read a lot about it, but basically it tells about ‘mistery cameras’ that have been found along streets around New York. It is really amazing that this can happen, and nobody seems to know where these cameras come from…

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January 14th 2011

Michael Moore about Wikileaks

Michael Moore about Wikileaks

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December 24th 2010

New interview with Assagne

The best quotes from the interview:

“He should be illegally assasinated” – that is the definition about terrorism

About Sarah Palin: “That just another idiot, trying to make a name for herself.”

Briliant :-)

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December 13th 2010

Ron Paul defends Wikileaks

Dead right, I would say…

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December 13th 2010

What’s wrong with Wikileaks?

I was pointed to this article, as a argument not to support this petition (which I did sign..)

Link

Basically, the argument in the article goes like this: ‘leaking is dangerous, because it will cause only more secrecy from the state’. I find this argument rather dumb, and much more dangerous than any leaking can be.
Even Julian Assange has said that the state must have some secrets. Nobody wants the exact location of any nuclear bombs to be known to the public, for instance. (Then again, I don’t want any nuclear bombs in the Netherlands at all… and Wikileaks showed us that there are… even when the government in it’s usual, weasely way denies nor confirms this….) If you are at war, you don’t want the plans for a attack leaked to the enemy, etc, etc.
But still. These are not the kind of things leaked by Wikileaks in this instance. When they did leak ‘military secrets’ some months ago (the infamous film with the attack on civilians) I think we can state that this was a legitimate leak.
The point is, that the whole stated purpose of Wikileaks is precisely to deny the state this kind of secrecy. Why, in a democratic society, should so many wheeling and dealing of the state be secret? Even in the supposedly open Dutch society, it remains awfully hard to get the document to release any documents at all. (There is a law, even named ‘Openness of Government”. But wielding it against the state takes so much time, that any release of documents will cost you more than half a year… While thus made legal if is very much impractical.)

I think that Wikileaks shows us that while not very surprising at least a disturbing amount of hazy deals are being made – in the name of the public…! Let us not forget that most of these people claim to represent that citizens that elected them. We did not elect them to keep secrets. And Wikileaks is preventing just that.

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December 8th 2010

A small step from hosanna to crucifixion…

Some quotes from Hillary Clinton, earlier this year… (Taken from the official site…)

We stand for a single internet where all of humanity has equal access to knowledge and ideas.

Really?

And censorship should not be in any way accepted by any company from anywhere. And in America, American companies need to make a principled stand. This needs to be part of our national brand. I’m confident that consumers worldwide will reward companies that follow those principles.

So, Mastercard, Amazon and PayPal are not American companies, are they?

A published reaction of Clinton to wikileaks:

“Let’s be clear. This disclosure is not just an attack on America — it’s an attack on the international community,” Clinton said Monday at a State Department news conference. Such leaks, she said, “tear at the fabric” of responsible government.

It’s a small step from hosanna to crucifixion, is it not? :-(

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December 8th 2010

Some more about th reaction of the US to Julian Assange/wikileaks

Up until today, Assange has systematically dodged international law enforcement. He has kept his website alive despite the policing of the U.S. government and the intense pressure it can place on corporations. (As an aside, the government’s influence on Amazon and PayPal proves that the U.S. puts pressure on major corporations only when it wants to. Keep this in mind the next time you’re contemplating why Wall Street bonuses are back to pre-crisis levels while you’re figuring out how to pay your rent and student loan debt in the face of your pay cut or salary freeze.)

Link

I’m afraid I have to agree here… The speed with which wikileaks has been blocked by Amazon and Paypal is frightening…

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December 8th 2010

The position of Julian Assange explained in detail

I think this is one of the best, if not the best, articles I found online that describes why Julian Assange is doing what Wikileaks is doing right now…

Link

I must say, I deeply agree with his reasoning. I hope that wikileaks can continue it’s work. I’m sure it;s not all good, but I think in total the effect should be positive on society…

BTW: by now it is clear that twitter is censoring #wikileaks. It will note that about a thousand tweets are done every few minutes if you search for #wikileaks, but it does still not show as a trend… amazing ;-(

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October 29th 2010

HTML5 databases (mis)used to track users…

Disturbing news from Ars:

Link

New technology being abused for commercial reasons… who would have guessed…? :-(

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October 11th 2010

Man (19) thrown in jail because of encrypted HD

Given that ever more goverments place ever more restrictions on what you can do with your own computers/telephones and what not, this is disturbing news….

Link

Of course, the tiring argument of child-pornography is rehashed again and again, as is ever the case in situations like this. It is still a strange argument, as far as I am concerned. Nobody would dream of out-lawing cameras using the same argument, would they?

By the way, I loved this comment on Slashdot:

There are other ways to remember passwords other than committing them to memory. I seem to remember hearing about intelligence agencies teaching spies passwords based on muscle memory so that they couldn’t be divulged under torture.

I’m a pianist and I’ve experimented with using passwords based on songs that I know by heart and it works great. My left hand is a bit sloppy, so I just use it on the shift key as if it was the sustain pedal. I had one password that was over 100 characters long and I had no problems entering it in. And even if someone knew the song, it’s doubtful they could determine the password since it depends entirely on how I play the piece and which part of the piano key I use for each note. I suppose someone could figure it out by watching me play the piece, but I’m not even sure that would work and I could always play it slightly differently if I knew I was being watched.

If someone is a talented musician, I could see them plausibly telling a jury that they’re unsure of the password because they enter it by playing a particularly difficult part of a song. Bonus difficulty points for telling them that the software is time sensitive and expects keys to be keyed in at the same rate as when the password was set.

(Link to comment.) :-)

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